RJ Comer

Born in Chicago and now living in the Tennessee woods, RJ has toured from Canada to Florida and throughout the U.S. Deftly straddling traditional and contemporary Americana and Blues, he’s garnered fans from biker bars to Bourbon Street, from farm towns to music festivals, and from coffee houses to concert halls.

2018 was a busy year for RJ, kicking off his tour with an official appearance at SXSW and releasing his critically-acclaimed LP One Last Kiss. He toured from Chicago to Texas to the Florida Keys, including official appearances at the Baton Rouge Third Street Songwriters Festival and the Key Largo Original Music Festival and doing live radio station appearances. Radio stations throughout the U.S. and Europe spun One Last Kiss, including the BBC in U.K. and the legendary WSM Opryland Radio in Nashville.

One Last Kiss is RJ’s first solo LP. His 2016 EP Nightly Suicide earned steady spins on Americana music stations, and Tampa’s WMNF 88.5 named it one of the best albums of 2016. In 2015 RJ released a two-sided single New Orleans Undercover, which debuted at #2 on iTunes New Blues Releases Chart. New Orleans Undercover was recorded in New Orleans with New Orleans musicians. His debut solo EP Hell Hole Swamp (March 2015) included tracks produced in Lafayette, Louisiana by True Blood and Treme’ contributor C.C. Adcock and featuring the legendary Stanton Moore on drums.

Releases

One Last Kiss

June, 2018

RJ’s first solo LP is a leap forward in the musical and emotional journey of his previous two solo EPs. Having left Los Angeles and moved to the Tennessee woods with his wife of 21 years, RJ seems to have relaxed a bit, showing a lighter and brighter side of himself on this new release. Though his darker emotions of loss, regret, and longing for redemption are not completely in abeyance, the longer LP format allows RJ to explore a greater range of emotions and musical textures than ever before. One Last Kiss was recorded in Nashville with multi-instrumentalist producer Shawn Byrne and features Grammy-winner Randy Kohrs (Jim Lauderdale and Dierks Bentley) on slide guitar and Daniel Foulks (Parker Milsap band) on Fiddle.

Nightly Suicide

March 25, 2016

“Nightly Suicide” is decidedly Americana Rock, yet is RJ’s most intimate and personal collection of songs dealing with addiction, failed relationships, conscience, redemption, and the open road. Multi-instrumentalist and producer Jef Scott (The Men) produced “Nightly Suicide” and collaborated closely with RJ to craft an Americana Rock sound that is both unflinching and introspective.

Hell Hole Swamp

Apr 07, 2015

The five original swamp songs on Hell Hole Swamp capture RJ’s love for swamp stories & legends — the shadow, the sin, the redemption, and the humor. Although a fusion of Louisiana and Carolina swamp influences, Hell Hole Swamp is contemporary Americana and is unlimited by boundaries. RJ plays plectrum banjo on every track and is accompanied by a wide variety of instruments, including acoustic and electric guitar, organ, fiddle, and horns on one track (“I Wasn’t Born an Angel”).

True Blood and Treme contributor C.C. Adcock produced two tracks “Smothered” and “I Wasn’t Born an Angel” in Lafayette, Louisiana. RJ’s long-time collaborator Rob Hill produced three other three tracks. Notable Louisiana artists participated in some of the tracks. The incomparable New Orleans drummer and percussionist Stanton Moore appears on these tracks along with Artelius Mystic (sousaphone) and Dave Rosser (organ). Like any southern American Swamp, Hell Hole Swamp can be charming and fun, but just as quickly can turn dark… “Beauty and danger occupy the same space in the shadowed grace of this foresaken place, called Hell Hole Swamp.”

New Orleans Undercover

Nov 12, 2015

New Orleans Undercover is the culmination of RJ’s Crescent City collaborations with the legendary Lee Floyd (2012 Inductee into the National Banjo Hall of Fame). From Bourbon Street to the Treme, RJ’s rich voice and Lee’s effortlessly masterful banjo solos delighted locals and tourists alike. So Lee brought his band of New Orleans musicians into the studio and they recorded two of their favorite songs—New Orleans style.